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Evaluating Internet Resources: Home

This guide will help you to think critically about Internet sources.

Forms to Evaluate Web Pages

“Students need to be skeptical of facts [found on webpages] until they perform some of the checks outlined here or find the same information in other materials.”

From: Johnson, Tom. "S.P.I.D.E.R. A Strategy For Evaluating Websites." Library Media Connection 29.6 (2011): 58-59. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts. Web. 25 Mar. 2015.

Welcome!

"Unlike most print resources such as magazines, journals, and books that go through a filtering process (e.g. editing, peer review, library selection), information on the Internet is mostly unfiltered. So using and citing information found over the Internet is a little like swimming without a lifeguard. The following guide provides a starting point for evaluating the World Wide Web sites and other Internet information."

From: Kapoun, Jim. "Teaching undergrads WEB evaluation: A guide for library instruction." C&RL News (July/August 1998): 522-523.

Internet Research: What’s Credible?

This is a video on how to search the Internet for academic purposes. It suggests the CRAAP test (currency, relevance, accuracy, authority, and purpose) to test online information credibility. The video highlights the role of libraries and librarians to provide credible online information: college libraries provide solid information in online databases and Librarians are experts identifying reliable information.

Internet Resources

S.P.I.D.E.R. A Strategy for Evaluating Websites

Source: Is the author qualified? Is the author providing credible information? You should identify the source or author of the website and obtain information about the author’s credentials and background.

Purpose: Is the company, group, or individual behind the website trying to sell something or convey a message? You must critically question the purpose of the site.

Information: Does the website have a publication or a “last updated’ date? If not, you should be skeptical and explore other sources to confirm facts and determine if the information is up to date and usable in a scholarly project.

Domain: The domain name can provide information about the website type: .edu is hosted by an educational institution, .com indicates a commercial website. To find a domain name click here.

Educational: Is the information understandable and presents an adequate amount of depth? Is a non-educational website or a hoax site?

Reliability: Validate the facts! Is the same information available on other websites or in other materials?

Adapted from: Johnson, Tom. "S.P.I.D.E.R. A Strategy For Evaluating Websites." Library Media Connection 29.6 (2011): 58-59. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts. Web. 25 Mar. 2015.